It’s OK to Not Be OK

How are you doing? The last couple of years have been a lot. The world changed. Today, life looks different for everyone. It’s OK if you’re not feeling OK.


Over the last two years, we faced a deadly global pandemic. COVID-19 brought isolation, uncertainty, sickness, job loss and death. It was a scary and tragic time, and it’s not over yet. Nobody knew what to expect. People did the best they could but for many, this triggered serious mental health problems. Psychologists report a rise in anxiety, depression and substance abuse.


The world is also now dealing with war. In February, Russia invaded Ukraine. This act of violence has dominated the headlines. Images of death and destruction are hard to avoid. These current events are bringing up past traumas for many soldiers and veterans, especially older vets who fought on European soil. Vets might be experiencing symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder or wondering if their service mattered.


Acknowledging these events isn’t meant to trigger past or current traumas. But it’s important to recognize that these recent world events have the potential to bring up negative emotions. Everyone has been impacted in some way. Many families struggled with deep feelings of loss. Children missed friends and school, and at times dealt with added stress at home. Even if your family wasn’t deeply affected, there can be feelings of guilt. People sometimes struggle knowing they are OK when others aren’t.


All of this is to say, it’s OK if you’re struggling right now. However you’re feeling and for whatever reason, we acknowledge the difficulties facing people today. The world isn’t back to normal yet, and we’re in for a new normal. People are still struggling and need help. If you’re one of the thousands of Americans who don’t feel OK right now, that’s OK. But it’s important to seek help.


We have a list of local and national resources on our website. If you have a child or know a young person who you think could benefit from some help, call The Link at (907) 789-7610 or email Link@jys.org.